BURKE TERMINISTIC SCREENS PDF

Overview[ edit ] Kenneth Burke develops the terministic screen in his book of essays called Language as Symbolic Action in He defines the concept as "a screen composed of terms through which humans perceive the world, and that direct attention away from some interpretations and toward others". Receivers interpret the intended message through a metaphorical screen of their own vocabulary and perspective to the world. The language we choose to use will be a representation of our reality, our world, our culture, and our beliefs, even without intention. Scientistic versus dramatistic[ edit ] Burke describes two different types of terministic screens: scientistic and dramatistic.

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Overview[ edit ] Kenneth Burke develops the terministic screen in his book of essays called Language as Symbolic Action in He defines the concept as "a screen composed of terms through which humans perceive the world, and that direct attention away from some interpretations and toward others". Receivers interpret the intended message through a metaphorical screen of their own vocabulary and perspective to the world. The language we choose to use will be a representation of our reality, our world, our culture, and our beliefs, even without intention.

Scientistic versus dramatistic[ edit ] Burke describes two different types of terministic screens: scientistic and dramatistic. Scientistic begins with a definition of a term; it describes the term as what it is or what it is not, putting the term in black and white. When defining, the essential function is either attitudinal or hortatory. In other words, the focus is on expressions or commands. When terms are treated as hortatory, they are developed.

Burke comments on why he uses developed rather than another word. The ultimate origins of language seem to me as mysterious as the origins of the universe itself. Via terministic screens, the audience will be able to associate with the term or dissociate from it.

However, some could think of intersex individuals. If someone says they think of male, female, and intersex, more would be reflected about the person based on their terminology. Still others would recognize gender as different from biological sex, and say they think of man, woman, and other genders. Another example occurs within the abortion controversy. A pro-choice advocate would most likely use the word "fetus" but pro-life advocates would use the word "baby", because the term stirs more realistic and relatable images and has a bearing on the legal status.

Using the word "baby" versus "fetus" defines reality differently scientistic and guides people to act in a certain way dramatistic solely based on term selection that may be unconscious. In other words, language is needed to perform thought and action. One can not think without language, and therefore can not act without language and thought. Burke contends these screens set up a network of beliefs through which all ideas will be interpreted.

Communication scholar Paul Stob contends that the language we use is thus not just a direct reflection of our intelligence, but also of perception and culture. David Blakesley posits that the terministic screen enables the further understanding of rhetorical perspectives. In each of these ways, the terministic screen allows for concepts to be interpreted in different ways by different people and contribute to the complexity of meaning. Philosophy and Rhetoric 42, no. In Language as Symbolic Action,

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Kenneth Burke

Reviewed by Jonathan A. Cannon Blakesley, David, ed. Carbondale: Southern Illinois University Press, , Cannon, Oklahoma State University Containing a rich sundry of filmic analyses channeling scrupulous rhetorical acumen, The Terministic Screen: Rhetorical Perspectives on Film , edited by David Blakesley, functions as a much-needed collection of articles that underscore en masse the nexus between rhetoric and the area of film studies. Through an eclectic array of rhetorical lenses, The Terministic Screen initiates a critical understanding of the medium of film. Part Two examines film that concern themselves with rhetoric, film, and culture more broadly. The second section contains articles spanning collective memory and the in famous Hollywood Blacklist of the s to anti-plutocratic rhetoric found in German cinema.

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Terministic Screens

Personal history[ edit ] He was born on May 5 in Pittsburgh , Pennsylvania , and graduated from Peabody High School , where his friend Malcolm Cowley was also a student. He would later marry her sister Elizabeth Batterham in and have two sons, Michael and Anthony. Burke served as the editor of the modernist literary magazine The Dial in , and as its music critic from Kenneth himself was an avid player of the piano.

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